Ready Player One – A Commentary On The Path of Modern Gaming

This past weekend along with the purchase of my Infinity War tickets, I bought tickets for a Friday night showing of Ready Player One. I had seen trailers of the movie for several months and just the premise of the film (the adventure of finding the coveted Easter Eggs) put it on my ‘to see list’. Prior to heading to the theater I checked the ratings on Rotten Tomatoes (just like everyone) and was pleased to see the 74% critic rating and the 80% audience rating. I briefly perused some of the negative critic reviews listed and noted they all said the same thing, “It’s a CGI slugfest with no plot”. What? You don’t go to a movie like Ready Player One expecting the intricacy of Inception or the character development of the Godfather series, you go to see CG characters duking it out in a video game style death match! I didn’t let these few negative reviews, that likened it to the recent Pacific Rim: Uprising for it gratuitous CGI usage and minimal plot, discolour my anticipation for the movie. I can honestly say, that while there are obvious plot holes and plot armour for some parts, it is a fun and exciting movie to kick back and watch with some popcorn.

One thing I did notice as I was watching it was that, as a gamer myself, the world of the Oasis is becoming an ever increasing possibility. Let me explain…

SOCIAL SPACES

It’s no secret that the majority of Ready Player One takes place in a virtual game called The Oasis. This game is the main setting for all of the events that really move the plot forward. It’s explained as a massive social space with various worlds that each tailor to different experiences. As they explain in the movie, the PvP area (Player vs. Player arena) is called Planet Doom, while there is a casino world, a racing world, a virtual vacation world and even a world where you can climb Mount Everest with Batman. This concept of social paces is nothing new to gaming. If you look at any online multiplayer game they all have a social space where you can interact with other players before venturing into the game world. Destiny has the Tower, Call of Duty WWII has the camp, and The Division has the HQ. Each of these spaces allow you to interact with other players by inviting them to join a party or challenging them to 1v1 matches.  In addition to social spaces, each game with an online multiplayer component also has a lobby that allows you to speak to other players either on your team for that match, or against you for that match.

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In Ready Player One, the entire Oasis is in itself a social space. While there are certain areas where you can kill other players freely, like Planet Doom, the nightclubs and cities tend to be safer. Social gaming is the next step in the online gaming path, gone are the days of having 4 friends crowding around one screen while playing Halo or Goldeneye. While you can still play socially with your friends in almost every game, each individual person now needs their own console and copy of the game (unless you game share). This step was taken to ensure maximum revenue by gaming companies for their product. While most people are not happy with this, it’s becoming more commonplace in today’s gaming market.

As games move more and more into social multiplayer territory, the size of these spaces is going to become much larger to accommodate the number of players in the game at any one time. For example, In Destiny when you venture to the Tower ( the social space), you are put into one of millions of tower models that each support 36 players. Depending on the number of people playing the game at any one time, there can be anywhere from several thousand to millions of identical towers each with a maximum of 36 players per tower. The game can only support so many different players at once and thus the developers needed to create multiple copies of each space to accommodate the load of the players and the rendering of the world.

As I said before, as social spaces become more and more common in games, they will grow larger and larger until it turns into a massive Oasis style world with everyone logged in and able to see each other at once.

ZEROING OUT/PERMA-DEATH

In Ready Player One, there is one major consequence to dying in the Oasis, that consequence is referred to as “zeroing out”. When a player zeroes out in the game, they lose all their credits and progression, forcing them to start from the beginning. This aspect of the Oasis is what makes the PvP battles on Planet Doom so nerve-wracking. I know I for one die extensively while playing an online multiplayer game. Normally, my kills outweigh my deaths giving me a positive K/D (kill death ratio) at the end of the game, but the deaths number is also quite large. If I had to zero out and lose all my progress every time I died… I doubt I would play games like that anymore. That being said, there are games that incorporate this consequence into modern gaming, they refer to it as perma-death.

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Perma-death is exactly how it sounds, permanent death; some of the more recent games to incorporate this aspect are: Day Z, FTL, X-COM, and Fire Emblem. In each of these games dying/losing all your lives means an instant game restart, which in turn loses all progress and gear accumulated throughout your session.  This brings an extra level of intensity to these games as you know that you can’t just revert to the last save a la Call of Duty, Halo or Assassin’s Creed.  The only difference with these games that feature perma-death, is that most of them, are not multiplayer. While you can have friends join and assist you in the game, the consequences are the same for them, death = instant restart. While there are some great gamers who can make it through the standard fps game levels on hardest difficulty without dying, they are few and far between. There is a game that basically melds the two aspects of respawn and perma-death together and that game is The Division.

In The Division, you play as an agent of the Division tasked with establishing an HQ in New York City following an bio-terror attack. As you progress through the game you accumulate gear which can be found throughout the world or purchased from in-game vendors. Once you have completed the main story and attained a high enough level you can take on “The Dark Zone”. The Dark Zone is a walled off area in the middle of the city with high level enemies and a free for all mentality. Players can roam around pillaging the high level gear in the Dark Zone and assist each other in taking down high level bosses, or engage in PvP firefights to steal each other’s gear. If you die in the Dark Zone, you lose all the gear you accumulated while there and you respawn back at the staging area. Each person can only carry so much gear while rampaging through the Dark Zone and eventually must call in a helicopter to extract it. Calling in the helicopter lets EVERYONE in the Dark Zone know where you are and what you’re doing, whether it’s other players or NPC enemies. There’s a time frame that you must hold the extraction zone before the helicopter arrives to extract the gear, which give malicious players and NPCs the time they need to kill you and steal your gear. I personally have lost many high level gear pieces to other players while trying to defend the extraction zone. It did not bode well with me.

While this isn’t an exact copy of the “zeroing out” mechanic from Ready Player One, permadeath and the Dark Zone are as close as we have right now.

EASTER EGG HUNTING

The entire premise of the film is to find three “Easter Eggs” left in the Oasis by the creator. When one person finds all 3, they will inherit controlling stock in the company and a fortune numbering in the hundreds of trillions of dollars. The concept of Easter Eggs has been around in the gaming world for decades. An “Easter Egg” for those unfamiliar with the term, is a special construct or nod the creators put in as a reference to either themselves or other projects.

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A notable example is in the 2016 release of Doom, when the creators put a portion of the original Doom game from 1993 in during the main story allowing exploratory players to enjoy a small portion of the original classic. Another example is in the game Halo: Reach, wherein if you complete the final mission on Heroic or Legendary; at the right moment in one of the cut-scenes, if you push both sticks to the right the camera will pan and show a shot of the Master Chief in his cryo tube. As I said before, these little nods to other games are what the meaning of an Easter Egg is.

Even though Easter Egg hunting has been around for a long time in gaming, and has now jumped into the film medium with the explosion of the MCU. While yes, there were Easter Eggs in film before the MCU, Marvel studios used them to the point of such success that a lot of other studios have started adding them to link their works together.

DECEIVING AVATARS

This in’t anything new, but they do make a point during the film to explain that while someone’s avatar may look like a young attractive female, doesn’t mean they aren’t really a 300lb dude that lives in his mom’s basement. This is something that is prevalent in not only gaming but society as a whole. With the anonymity of the internet you can appear as anybody you want, regardless of being in a game or not. It’s something that people need to watch out for while perusing the web or the gaming lobbies. Aech, pronounced “H” (one of the characters in the film), makes a joke out of it, but it’s an issue that can have serious real world consequences. The “Nigerian Prince” that emails you promising to share their fortune with you if you send them $500 right now is 100% a scam, but some people fall for it and end up getting burned for thousands of dollars because the “prince” stole their identity.

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In the film, the players in the Oasis are able to model their avatars after anything they wish. Some choose other gaming characters such as Halo Spartans and Overwatch characters, some choose movie characters like Freddy Kreuger or Robocop, and some go for a mix of everything. The concept of making your avatar as far from what you really look like is nothing new, but some of the players in the movie do take it to the extreme. Not only does your avatar mask what you really look like, but it also masks your actual age. With most multiplayer games, you can ball park someone’s age when they speak in the game chat, but that’s not always the case. Ready Player One uses this as an interesting concept for a few characters and it helps to hammer home to anonymity of the gaming world.

CHARACTER PROGRESSION/POWERFUL WEAPONS/IN GAME PURCHASES (PAY TO WIN)

Character progression is the cornerstone of many RPG and Shared World shooter games, and this is something the Oasis takes into account during the film. While if you die you zero out and lose all your gear, if you’re good enough as with some of the characters in the movie, you can get over 10+ years of experience and gear which helps you out immensely.  The opening of the movie focuses on one particular battle on Planet Doom. The prize for winning this battle is a gauntlet that allows the wearer to assume the identity of any mechanical being they wish. This prize plays a big part later on in the film and when the character uses it, I will admit… I did get a little giddy in my seat and throw my hands in the air in excitement. This character progression and power weapon concept is very aptly exemplified by the Elder Scrolls series.

The Elder Scrolls is probably one of the most successful RPG franchises the world over. The game is made by Bethesda studios, and in it, the player controls a character of their own design in the fantastical world of Tamriel. As you progress through the main story your character levels up until you can unlock certain quests. Some of these quests, gift you with weapons based on the powers of the literal Gods from the lore in the game. I won’t get to into the explanation because if you’re not a fan it won’t make any sense and can get quite boring; however, the weapons you can get on these quests can vastly improve your combat effectiveness in the game to the point of walking through boss battles.

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Ready Player One utilizes this concept with the gauntlet as I previously explained; but, they also allow for players to utilize the currency they obtain in the game to purchase weapons and various other nick knacks that can be used in game and in the real world. One such device a player can purchase, is the Holy Hand Grenade on Antioch from Monty Python fame, which is a very powerful weapon in game, or they can purchase a VR suit for use in the real world to augment their Oasis experience. Pay to Win is something that is plaguing current gaming. It allows for people who don’t want to spend the hours developing skills and unlocking weapons and perks the traditional way, to purchase the upgrades they want for real world money. This makes for very unbalanced first few months of a game’s release and is the cause of some very vocal outcry by fans, Star Wars Battlefront II from 2017 is a prime example.

Ready Player One is based off the book by Ernest Cline from 2011, which was released fairly recently for a movie to be adapted from it. At the time the book was written, some of the trends he explores in the novel and that get explored in the movie, were already becoming very prevalent in the gaming world. Loot boxes, pay to win, level progression and perma death were all making their introduction into the gaming market when the book was written. The film does a great job of showing how these concepts are being taken and ran with and how in the future, this could become the norm for gaming. While each individual company, Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo, would never agree to produce a game together, eventually one of them may win out the dreaded “console war” and then the concept of Ready Player One could really take shape.

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Jurassic Park – None Of It Was Real

This week I’m going to deviate from the comic topic for a bit and talk about something a good friend of mine Malcolm showed me, a theory surrounding the original Jurassic Park. If you were like me and saw it at a very early age then you probably grew up loving dinosaurs and everything about them. The original film directed by Steven Spielberg was released on June 9, 1993; I was a whopping 1.5 years old at that point. The movie is based on a novel written by Michael Crichton who also co-wrote the screenplay showing you how faithful the movie is to the source material. Crichton is famous for his work with Jurassic Park but two of his other works that i thoroughly enjoy are The Andromeda Strain and Timeline. Sadly Michael Crichton passed away in November of 2008, but a new novel was just published posthumously titled Dragon Teeth which features dinosaur bones and gunslingers… if that’s not a great combination then I don’t know what is.

Before we get to the theory let’s give a bit of a background on the plot of the movie/book.

BACKGROUND

The entire premise of the movie is that a wealthy businessman named John Hammond (CEO of InGen) discovers a way that by using modern technology they can bring dinosaurs back to life. By hunting for fossilized mosquitoes that have been trapped in amber (fossilized tree sap) they extract the DNA of the last dinosaur that particular mosquito bit, and use a species of frog, fill in the DNA gaps to get viable dinosaur DNA. They then use this DNA along with modern genetic research to clone dinosaurs and alter their genetic structure to ensure all the dinosaurs are female to avoid uncontrolled breeding. InGen purchased an island in Costa Rica called Isla Nublar where they opened a theme park to showcase their dinosaurs.  When a park dino handler is killed by a Velociraptor the investors order Hammond to bring in some outside experts to validate the park and their security measures. Things obviously do not go according to plan and the dinosaurs get loose. Not only are the dinosaurs loose but it is later revealed that the species of frog they used to fill the DNA gaps can actually change it’s sex for mating and thus the dinosaurs have been breeding uncontrolled.

Now that the background is explained let’s move onto the theory…

So the theory comes from Redditor Brownra04, and the theory goes like this, there were never any actual dinosaurs at Jurassic Park. The entire idea of Jurassic Park centers around the idea that geneticists extrapolated usable dinosaur DNA from the fossilized mosquitoes which we know is not possible, even within the realm of the movie. The DNA has a half life that would’ve decayed beyond any reasonable form prior to the 65 million year discovery. Not only that but the theory also adds that the mosquitoes would have bitten more than one dinosaur and that would have contaminated the sample. Having DNA from potentially hundreds of different dinosaurs with no way to distinguish them is a geneticists nightmare. In order to cover this up InGen used DNA from known reptiles to create the “dinosaurs” on display at Jurassic Park.

size of raptor

This is also explained that we know Velociraptors are roughly three feet tall and covered in feathers, not the nine foot man-eating killing machines from the movies.  We also learn in subsequent movies that all the births of the dinosaurs take place on the second island Isla Sorna. This directly contradicts John Hammond when he says that insists on being present for every birth. Hammond also tells Dr. Ellie Sattler that he started his career with a travelling flea circus that (despite the testimony of the kids he performed his circus for) had no actual fleas in it at all. The theory continues that the whole point of the visit from Drs. Grant, Sattler, and Malcolm was that if Hammond could fool a paleontologist and a paleobotanist into believing he had brought dinosaurs and extinct plants back to life and a mathematician into believing the science all added up, then he could fool the general public. The entirety of Jurassic Park was fabricated and the whole thing was a sham!

HOW IT WORKS

As the theory previously stated the subsequent movies that were released as sequels to this provide more and more future insight to the validity of the theory.  The Lost World the sequel to the original Jurassic Park shows the protagonists and antagonists travel to the first island and discover that the first island was only a show for the tourists and that everything was actually done on the second island. The third film shows Dr. Grant travel to the second island and see for himself that everything was done there and that the nightmare of the Jurassic Park was far from over. The fourth film (and the newest Jurassic World) shows the geneticist from the first movie Dr. Henry Wu ( played by B.D. Wong) working with the new park and cross breeding dinosaurs DNA with modern animals to create new dinos.  The biggest example of this is the big bad dino from the film the Indominus Rex which was an amalgamation of T-Rex, Gigantosaurus, Rugops, Majungasaurus, Carnotaurus, Tree Frog and Cuttlefish DNA to breed the perfect killing machine.

Indominus

The reason that the cross breeding went as smoothly as it did for the whole 4th movie was that the geneticists had been doing it all along and that when all their research was lost when InGen abandoned the islands, they didn’t lose their access to dino DNA samples because they never existed in the first place. This also explains why all the dinosaurs in the movies look how we imagine them to, giant pi-pedal killing lizards; when in reality, they probably all had feathers and most were probably smaller than we picture them to be.

IMPACT

I’m not going to lie, this theory had me sitting there scratching my head and trying to find ways to prove it wrong. Like the theory that Indiana Jones is not essential to the Plot of Raiders of the Lost Ark at all. I will be the first to admit, this theory actually makes sense and can work in the context of the series. Do I believe that this is what Michael Crichton and Steven Spielberg wanted to convey when they started this franchise all those years ago? absoloutely not. That being said I can very much appreciate the amount of thought and work that went into this theory and I commend Brownra04 for bringing this to the world. For myself, and I think many others, the magic of Jurassic Park will always be about the tenacity of man playing God. I like my dinosaurs coming from Amber and I like them cloning them back to life. the entire series is (as the tagline of the original movie said) and adventure 65 million years in the making.

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